Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS): Suggestions for a nutritional treatment in the therapeutic approach, by Geir Bjørklund, Maryam Dadar, Joeri J Pen, Salvatore Chirumbolo, Jan Aaset in Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy Vol 109, Jan 2019, Pp 1000-1007

Review abstract:
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is known as a multi-systemic and complex illness, which induces fatigue and long-term disability in educational, occupational, social, or personal activities. The diagnosis of this disease is difficult, due to lacking a proper and suited diagnostic laboratory test, besides to its multifaceted symptoms. Numerous factors, including environmental and immunological issues, and a large spectrum of CFS symptoms, have recently been reported.

In this review, we focus on the nutritional intervention in CFS, discussing the many immunological, environmental, and nutritional aspects currently investigated about this disease. Changes in immunoglobulin levels, cytokine profiles and B- and T- cell phenotype and declined cytotoxicity of natural killer cells, are commonly reported features of immune dysregulation in CFS. Also, some nutrient deficiencies (vitamin C, vitamin B complex, sodium, magnesium, zinc, folic acid, l-carnitine, l-tryptophan, essential fatty acids, and coenzyme Q10) appear to be important in the severity and exacerbation of CFS symptoms.

This review highlights a far-driven analysis of mineral and vitamin deficiencies among CFS patients.

Excerpt:

A meta-analysis with 27 studies concludes that there are still few data to provide a promising hypothesis for the effective role of mineral and vitamin supplementation in the CFS pathophysiology and therapy. Current studies on minerals and vitamins in CFS patients need large population-based and age-matched prospective research, as well as well-observed interventional studies in CFS patients, to achieve more awareness in the efficacy of minerals and vitamins in the CFS pathophysiology. According to this analysis, vitamin A and vitamin E are promising vitamins that need further examination.

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2 Responses to CFS: Suggestions for a nutritional treatment in the therapeutic approach

  1. Clive Bennett says:

    That’s because people are having a reaction to the tablets that are dispensed.

    • wames says:

      It does appear that many people with ME do react badly to all sorts of meds & supplements in both tablet and liquid form. There is also some question about how well supplements are absorbed by pwme, so researching this topic could be a major challenge.